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Just for the Halibut

Just for the HalibutJust for the HalibutJust for the Halibut

Not only is it delicious, but California Halibut is very good for you! It is low in saturated fat and sodium and is a very good source of protein (21g/per 1/2 lb serving), niacin, phosphorus, and selenium. Selenium is a trace mineral that is essential to good health, it is incorporated into proteins to make selenoproteins, which are important antioxidant enzymes. The antioxidant properties of selenoproteins help prevent cellular damage from free radicals. Free radicals are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism that may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Other selenoproteins help regulate thyroid function and play a role in the immune system.

Just for the halibut?…just for the selenium!

In terms of sustainability with halibut you really need to ASK QUESTIONS! Whether you should buy or order California halibut depends on the fishing methods used: best option is of course hook-and-line caught or even bottom trawl-caught. Try to avoid California halibut caught by gillnets, which frequently catch marine mammals and seabirds. Gillnets account for one quarter of the total California halibut catch. H&H’s halibut is always hook and line caught by our local boys. This fish we have today came to you from Matt Rockhold (Rocky) just yesterday.

Halibut is one of the most versatile fish to cook. It can be baked, broiled, fried, grilled, pan sautéed, and poached. The firm white meat of Halibut fillets and the mild flavor makes this a great fish for any recipe calling for whitefish. The main thing to remember when cooking Halibut is that it will dry out on you fast, because it contains very little oil. So if you are baking, broiling, or grilling it, make sure you have marinated it or brushed it witha little oil or butter to help retain the moisture.  If you are using a marinade choose one that will not over power the delicate flavor of Halibut. Marinades with strong acidic will breakdown the meat, making it become soft or mushy. If you’d like lemon on it, be sure to squeeze it on after you cook it, not before.

Basic cooking techniques for cooking perfect halibut-

Grilling: The low oil content will make it stick to the grill so make sure you start with a clean grill grate and make sure to oil your grate before you start cooking. Apply a generous amount of olive oil, butter or marinade to your steak or fillet. The 10 minute an inch rule applies here. So a 1 inch steak should take about 10 minutes to grill over a medium high heat. Make sure to only turn the fish one time to avoid it falling apart as it is cooking. Thinner steaks or halibut fillets could cook in around 6 minutes.
Baking: Baking halibut is probably the easiest way you will find to cook halibut. Pre-oil a casserole dish (oven safe) with cooking spray. Season your fish and apply a small amount of olive/grapeseed/coconut to the top. In a preheated 400 degree oven, bake for approximately 15 minutes. About halfway through you may want to baste with oil or marinade again to prevent dry-out.
Broiling: Preheat the broiler make sure to coat the broiler pan with some type of oil/cooking spray, also brush the halibut with some type of oil. Place the broiler pan about 3 to 4 inches away from the top and broil for about 10 minutes. We like to turn our halibut after 5 minutes and baste again.
Deep Frying: Halibut makes some great fish and chips. You can use a beer batter, or a seasoned flour mix for deep frying. Cut the halibut into small chunks, not to thin and not to thick. Deep fry at 375 until golden brown. We would also recommend that you get a thermometer for checking the oil temperature of your fry. Some fryers do not maintain the right temperature.
Pan Searing: Pan searing adds a nice crust to the outside of the Halibut. You can cook the Halibut all the way in the pan or you can partial cook it and finish it off in the oven.
For complete searing in the pan. Use a non stick skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over a medium high heat. Add the Halibut and sear for 5 to 7 minutes. Flip the fish and add 2 tablespoons of butter, spoon the butter over the Halibut as they cook for another 5 to 7 minutes. Your time might vary depending on the thickness of the steak or fillet.
Pan searing and finish cooking in the oven. Pre heat your oven to 350 degrees. In a sauté pan that is oven safe heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium high heat, sear steaks or fillets for about 3 minutes on each side. Transfer the pan to the oven and finish cooking for about another 5 to 6 minutes.

Sautéed Halibut with Shaved Fennel Salad

Ingredients
For Salad
1 small fennel bulb, feathery top discarded
2 tablespoon basil olive oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 tablespoon minced shallot
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon(s) freshly ground pepper
1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
2 cups baby spinach leaves

For Halibut
2 tablespoon basil olive oil
1 lb halibut fillet
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 teaspoon unsalted butter

Preparation
Salad: Using a mandolin or V-slicer, cut fennel lengthwise into very thin slices. In a large bowl, whisk oil, vinegar, shallot, salt, and pepper. Scatter onion over dressing, then top with fennel and spinach (do not toss).
Halibut: Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until oil is hot. Season halibut with salt and pepper. Add fillets to skillet; cook until golden brown on first side, about 4 minutes. Turn fillet(s); cook 3 to 4 minutes longer, until barely opaque in center. Remove to a plate. Deglaze skillet with wine and bring to a boil. Reduce by half, then remove from heat and swirl in butter until emulsified. Spoon pan sauce over fillets. Toss fennel salad and serve with halibut.
adapted from delish.com


Halibut with Persimmon Tomato and Dill Relish

Ingredients
2 cups diced Persimmon tomato (about 3 medium)
3 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
1 tablespoon finely chopped seeded jalapeño pepper
1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1 pound halibut fillet
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive /grapeseed/coconut oil
Cooking spray
Dill sprigs (optional)

Preparation
Prepare grill. Combine the first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl; stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. Toss gently to coat.  Brush fish with oil; sprinkle evenly with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper. Place fish on grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 2 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork or until desired degree of doneness. Serve with tomato mixture; garnish with dill sprigs, if desired.
adapted from Cooking Light Aug, 2008

Chimichurri Halibut Tacos (

Ingredients
2 cups fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
2 tablespoons fresh oregano
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper
5 garlic cloves, crushed
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 lb halibut fillet
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
Cooking spray
12 (6-inch) corn tortillas or cabbage leaves!

Preparation
Place first 5 ingredients in a food processor; process until finely chopped. Slowly pour oil through food chute; process until smooth. Place fish in a shallow dish; rub mixture over fish. Cover and chill 2 hours (optional.)
Preheat grill to high heat. Sprinkle fish with salt and black pepper. Place fish on a grill rack coated with cooking spray, and grill for 4 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Remove from grill. Break fish into chunks. Heat tortillas according to package directions. Divide fish evenly among tortillas/cabbage shells and serve with whatever else you like in there!
adapted from Cooking Light June, 2011

Now go get your HALIBUT on and Enjoy! Thank you!!!

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Opah—aka Moonfish—is always such a treat to get in! 👁👄👁 This warm-blooded pelagic fish generally spends most of its time in at depth between surface level to 600 feet. Opah is also an interesting fish because it has six different cuts. 🔪 There's the Top, Mid, and Center Cut Loin, Belly, Back Tail, and the Abductor. Each with cut has a slightly different texture and taste that makes for great eating regardless if you're looking at just one cut or all six. The photo above is of the belly. 🤤 It tastes somewhere between a tuna and a salmon with a rich and firm, fatty texture. We hope you give it a try and love it! Find it at our main shop in the Santa Cruz Harbor. ⚓️
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Sometimes, the simplest things are the best 🙌. This is definitely true when cooking Halibut. We love fresh local Halibut with just a few simple ingredients— Butter, Salt, Pepper, and Lemon. The delicate flavor of the Halibut is allowed to shine when prepared this way—it's a guaranteed crowd-pleaser, even for picky eaters.👶🏼 If you have a favorite way that you enjoy cooking Halibut, we'd love to hear it! Different recipes and methods can really help to make your fish stand out, so don't be afraid to experiment and share your findings with us. We're always happy to have a new take on an old favorite. 🧡⚓️
Can you name all five of these fish in this photo just by their tails? Comment your best guess below! 👇🏽🧐 Here's a hint 😉: B _ _ _ _ _ _ R _ _ _ _ _ _ _ H _ _ _ _ _ _ B _ _ _ _ _ _ _ S _ _ _ _ _